Windows 7 Ending?

Here’s a question from one of my customers:

I see that Windows 7 finishes in January, do you think it’s worth upgrading my computer to Windows 10? How much is the cost for this?

I am being asked this sort of question a lot recently. Here’s my answer.

When Microsoft ends support for Windows 7 on 14th Jan 2020, nothing will change immediately. If it worked on Jan 13th, it’ll still work on Jan 15th.

There are two implications though:

  1. Microsoft will no longer have people working in Windows 7, so any problems that are found with it won’t be fixed. There is only one area where this matters – security flaws. If a security weakness is found in Windows 7 in the future, it won’t be fixed. Arguably, this makes Win 7 less secure as time passes, but personally I think the dangers are overstated. It’s ages since any security flaws were discovered in Win7, and anyway most home-PC attacks are not based on security flaws in the operating system, they are based on tricking the user.

  2. More importantly, other companies will stop testing new versions of their products on Windows 7, because if Microsoft has lost interest in it, they reckon they can too. So Sage 2021, for example, probably won’t be guaranteed to run on Windows 7. It may do, but Sage won’t guarantee that it will. So if you run any program that needs to be kept up to date, there’s no guarantee that this will be possible after 2020. For most people that doesn’t matter much – even if future versions of some program won’t work, the version they have now will still be fine.

    The problem eventually comes, for most people, with their browser – the thing they look at web pages with. Things like Chrome get regular updates to cope with fancy new websites. Over time, never versions of Chrome won’t work on Windows 7, and you might not be able to view some websites properly.

    You’d also have to find an anti-virus program where future updated versions will work under Windows 7, but that should be fairly easy, at least for a few years. I think Malwarebytes that I recommend will be OK.

All that takes ages to really become a problem – several years. So I’d say there’s no need to do anything for a year or two, but when the time comes to buy a new computer, it probably should use Windows 10. All new computers do, anyway.

It’s a bit like running an old car. I used to have a Saab, and then Saab went out of business. Nothing stopped me running the car, but
over time spare parts got harder to get (but not impossible). But after a while it didn’t meet new emission regulations (it was a diesel)
and they wanted to change me for driving into London (plus the congestion change) and higher road tax. So when the time came to
change it, I couldn’t buy another Saab anyway, but I bought a petrol car rather than another diesel. Same when they phased out 4-start petrol – nothing changed overnight, but over a few years we all changed to unleaded.

So it’s the same with Windows 7. No need to do anything for a couple of years, but when you buy your next PC, don’t expect it to be Windows.

Windows 10 is OK anyway, and much of it is better than Windows 7. It’s pretty similar to Windows 7, so (unlike with Windows 8) people usually get used to it reasonably