All posts by Paul Doherty

Log in to G Suite

G Suite is Google’s paid-for version of GMail. You can use your own domain name with it, so you can be paul1@pdoc.co.uk rather than something ending @gmail.com.

You log in exactly as you would with GMail. The process varies a bit depending on what you have been doing before. Start by going to the Google search page (for example http://google.co.uk) in a web browser, such as Chrome, Firefox, Safari, Edge, Internet Explorer or Opera.

The Google page will look like this (although on some days the “Google” lettering might look quite different, if Google is celebrating someone’s birthday etc). We’re interested in the bit at the top right, which I’ve circled in red:

If it looks like this (below), you are already logged in to GMail or G Suite (the little circle will contain your initials or a picture):

In this case, click on the circle, and either choose your account from the list or click on “Add Account”

If you click on “Add Account”, you will see this. Type in your G Suite email address:

Click “Next” to carry on logging in. You will be asked for a password (and in some situations a text message may be sent to your phone with a code you also have to type in).

If the bit at the top of the Google search page looked like this:

In this case, click on “Gmail”. You may be asked for your Google email address or you may be shown a list of addresses you have previously used, like this:

You see this if you have previously used a Google email address with this browser

In this case, if the email address you want to use is not shown, just click on “use another account” and type in your G Suite address, as before:

It’s a lot simpler than it sounds!

Sound not working?

If your sound has suddenly stopped working, and you’re running Windows 10 (version 1803) and received an automatic Microsoft update on or around 11th October 2018, Microsoft have a post about how to fix it here.

There’s also a rather more technical Reddit thread here which explains how to fix it from the Command prompt or a Powershell prompt (in either case it must be an admin-level prompt). Essentially, list the drivers with

pnputil /enum-drivers

and find the one that looks like this:

Original Name: intcaudiobus.inf
Provider Name: Intel(R) Corporation
Class Name: System devices
Class GUID: {4d36e97d-e325-11ce-bfc1-08002be10318}
Driver Version: 08/22/2018 09.21.00.3755
Signer Name: Microsoft Windows Hardware Compatibility Publisher

Note the “Published Name” – let’s say it’s this:

 Published Name: oemXXXX.inf

Finally, do this command, using the value you found instead of oemXXXX.inf:

pnputil /delete-driver oemXXXX.inf /uninstall

Sound should now work. No need to restart the PC.

This only affects PCs which use Intel High Definition Audio; by 12th October 2018 Microsoft had withdrawn the update, but if it has already been applied, it stays applied and your sound won’t work.

Password-protect a spreadsheet

It can be useful to protect an Excel spreadsheet with a password, for example before sending it by e-mail. Password-protected files are also encrypted, so there’s no way of seeing their contents without knowing the password.

You can do the same with Word documents. The process is virtually identical to that described below for Excel.  Access databases can also be password protected, although it’s a little more complicated (look for File | Info | Encrypt with Password).

Here are step-by-step instructions for putting a password on an Excel spreadsheet. Continue reading Password-protect a spreadsheet

Freeserve E-Mail to End

Anyone with an email address from Freeserve, Orange, or Wanadoo will find that it doesn’t work after 31st May 2017, and they won’t be able to access their account or send or receive emails.

Freeserve was bought by Orange years ago, and then Orange was bought by EE and now EE is part of BT. So the current owners have decided to shut down all the old email systems they have inherited.

Their explanation (and a full list of the affected email systems) is here.

How do I know if an email is genuine?

Sooner or later you’ll get an email telling you you’ve won the lottery, ordered something you don’t remember ordering, missed a delivery, are due a tax refund, or that you need to “verify your account”. How do you know if you can trust these emails or not?

The first thing to know is that you can’t trust who the email says it’s from. Here’s a message from my spam folder:

It says it’s from someone called “Track My PPI”, whose email address is sigint@app.topica.com. Maybe it is, maybe it isn’t, but I can’t tell from the email address that is shown.  This is no more reliable than the address written at the top of a paper letter – it’s created by the sender. If they are dishonest, it may well be a lie. Just because it’s “the computer” doesn’t make it true. Continue reading How do I know if an email is genuine?

How do I know if a website is genuine?

Click to enlarge

Sooner or later everyone gets an email saying you have to “verify your account” and warning of the dire consequences if you don’t. These are always a scam.  No-one genuine will ever ask you to verify (or “re-verify”) your account. Sometimes you might have to verify your email address (by click on a link in the email) but you’d never have to verify your account. Here’s a screenshot (left) of a typical “verification” page. It says it’s from Apple, but it’s not.

You’d get to this site by clicking on a link in an email that “Apple” sent you. We’ll look at that in a later post, but for the minute let’s look at the web page. Continue reading How do I know if a website is genuine?

How to stop Microsoft Word from double-spacing everything

I get asked this a lot. Microsoft changed how Word initially works a version or two ago, and here I explain (with screenshots from Word 2016) what’s going on.

One feature of Word that new users tend to ignore is its “styles” function. Initially, Word uses the “Normal” style, but lots of other styles are available, for example the “No Spacing” style. To choose a style, just click it on the “Home” tab:

Click to enlarge

Continue reading How to stop Microsoft Word from double-spacing everything